martedì 07 aprile 2020 18:15 Età: 49 days

IATA, presentato il Safety Report 2019

Categoria: Aeroporti, Pubblicazioni, Safety Security , Archivio, Dossier, Incidenti aerei, Human factor, Std ICAO ENAC, Piani di rischio, Aerolinee

 

“Accidents” ovvero gli “incidenti aeronautici” (esclusi inconvenienti gravi e inconvenienti)

La Iata (International Air Transport Association) ha reso disponibile on-line il Safety Report l 2019. I dati relativi al numero degli incidenti occorsi ha rivelato un miglioramento del livello di Safety delle aerolinee, sia in relazione al 2018, quando alla media dei cinque anni precedenti. La presentazione on-line del testo introduttivo del 56 Safety Report ha elencato il numero degli incidenti registrati e la loro localizzazione regionale/continentale.

 

“The airline industry saw its safety performance improve again in 2019, as the number of total accidents, fatal accidents and fatalities all declined compared to 2018 as well as to the five-year trend lines, even as the number of flights rose to a record 46.8 million. Airlines on the IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA) registry—which includes all IATA airlines—outperformed airlines that are not on the registry. 

Loss of control-inflight and hard landings caused the highest number of fatalities in 2019, reinforcing the need to continue identifying risks and threats and take steps to mitigate them.

The 56th edition of the Annual Safety Report (2019), includes in-depth review of these and other global and regional aviation statistics, including:

Essential insight into global and regional accident rates and contributing factors

Maintenance Errors Analysis from the Global Aviation Data Management programs

Regional overview of the safety metrics and corresponding activities for targeted risk management

 

Did you know?

4.54 billion travelers, the equivalent of more than half the world’s population flew safely on 46.8 million flights in 2019

There were 53 aircraft accidents and 240 fatalities in 2019.

The all accident rate (including Substantial Damage and Hull Loss accidents for IATA and non-IATA jets and turboprops) improved from 1.36 accidents per million sectors in 2018 to 1.13 in 2019. The 2019 all accident rate of 1.13 was also an improvement over the rolling five-year average rate of 1.56 per million sectors for 2014-2018.

The number of fatalities in 2019 decreased compared to 2018 (240 vs. 523)

The all accident rate for airlines on the IOSA registry was 0.92 per 1 million sectors, versus 1.63 for non-IOSA

 

All major 2019 safety performance indicators improved compared to 2018 and to the average of the 2014-2018 period as shown below:

There were also 7 fatalities on the ground in the accident involving Busy Bee Congo

“The safety and wellbeing of our passengers and crew is aviation’s highest priority. The release of the 2019 Safety Report is a reminder that even as aviation faces its deepest crisis, we are committed to making aviation even safer. Based on the 2019 fatality risk, on average, a passenger could take a flight every day for 535 years before experiencing an accident with one fatality on board. But we know that one accident is one too many. Every fatality is a tragedy and it is vital that we learn the correct lessons to make aviation even safer,” said Alexandre de Juniac, IATA’s Director General and CEO.

Jet hull loss rates by region of operator (per million departures)

Five regions showed improvement in 2019 compared to the previous five years (2014-2018) in terms of the jet hull loss rate.

REGION

2019

2014-2018

Global

0.15

0.24

Africa

1.39

1.01

Asia Pacific

0.00

0.30

Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)

2.21

1.08

Europe

0.00

0.13

Latin America and the Caribbean

0.00

0.57

Middle East and North Africa

0.00

0.44

North America

0.09

0.17

North Asia

0.15

0.00

Turboprop hull loss rates by region of operator (per million departures)

All regions except for Latin America and the Caribbean showed improvement when compared to their respective five-year rates. Accidents involving turboprop aircraft represented 41.5% of all accidents in 2019 and 50% of fatal accidents.

REGION

2019

2014-2018

Global

0.69

1.40

Africa

1.29

5.40

Asia Pacific

0.55

0.87

Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)

15.79

16.85

Europe

0.00

0.15

Latin America and the Caribbean

1.32

0.26

Middle East and North Africa

0.00

3.51

North America

0.00

0.67

North Asia

0.00

5.99

IOSA

In 2019, the all accident rate for airlines on the IOSA registry was nearly two times better than that of non-IOSA airlines (0.92 vs. 1.63) and it was more than two-and-a-half times better over the 2014-18 period (1.03 vs. 2.71). All IATA member airlines are required to maintain their IOSA registration. There are currently 439 airlines on the IOSA Registry of which 139 are non-IATA Members.

Fatality Risk

Fatality risk measures the exposure of a passenger or crew to a catastrophic accident with no survivors. The calculation of fatality risk does not consider aircraft size or how many were on board. What is measured is the percentage of fatalities among those on-board. This is expressed as fatality risk per millions of flights. The 2019 fatality risk of 0.09 means that on average, a person would have to travel by air every day for 535 years before experiencing an accident with at least one fatality. On average, a person would have to travel every day for 29,586 years to experience a 100% fatal accident.”